MostNorthern Christmas Book List (Or Books For Jólabókaflóð)

Iceland’s relationship with books is one that, as a writer and bibliophile, has me in tears. I could move to the the land of ice and fire quite happily based solely on how passionate everyone is about literature.

It’s estimated that 1 in 10 Icelanders will write a book in their lifetime and the small, Nordic country has more writers, more books published and more books read than anywhere else in the world.

It came as no surprise to  learn Iceland has a special celebration for books, one which practically the whole country participates in. It’s called jólabókaflóð which translates to the ‘Christmas Book Flood.’

The celebration actually begins in September, when the Icelandic Book Association posts a book catalogue to every home in Iceland. (The catalogue is called Bókatíðindi and you can browse this year’s edition here if you would like.)

So, from September onward there’s a book buying hysteria in Iceland, which culminates on Christmas Eve when people gift each other the books they’ve been frantically buying. The rest of the evening is then spent reading. I can’t think of anything more perfect than that.

I believe so strongly that we need to be more Icelandic when it comes to our relationship with books, that I’ve put together a list of northerly reads to inspire your own jólabókaflóð.

Icelanders give paperback books on Christmas Eve, but the ones I’ve listed here are all available on Amazon Kindle, so you can have them pretty much instantly to read. If you don’t have a Kindle, (I don’t) no stress, you can download the FREE Kindle app here for IOS, Android, Mac and PC.

Happy reading!

Ice Bear By Michael Engelhard

51UHoRGKo8L.jpg

I’ve been wanting to read Ice Bear ever since it popped up on Amazon as a recommended read a month or so ago.

While it’s the priciest book on this list, with the Kindle Edition coming in at a hefty £15.21 if you’re invested in deepening your knowledge of this most important and beautiful species, it’s entirely worth it.

“From Inuit shamans to Jean Harlow lounging on a bearskin rug, from the cubs trained to pull sleds toward the North Pole to “cuddly” superstar Knut, it all comes to life in these pages.

With meticulous research and more than 160 illustrations, the author brings into focus this powerful and elusive animal. Doing so, he delves into the stories we tell about Nature–and about ourselves–hoping for a future in which such tales still matter.” – Amazon.

Buy it here.

Dark Matter By Michelle Paver

Dark Matter is one of my all-time favourite books, and I featured it in my Top Ten Ten Books About The North list  back in February. It’s a gloriously creepy ghost story set in 51HeHhcACUL._SY346_the High Arctic and it leaves no nerve unturned.

For years I longed for a book like Dark Matter and when it came along, it was everything I wanted and more. There’s a really good reason this book has nearly 400 reviews on Amazon and almost a full 5 stars. If you choose Dark Matter, you’ll be up all night reading, I promise.

‘January 1937. Clouds of war are gathering over a fogbound London. Twenty-eight year old Jack is poor, lonely and desperate to change his life. So when he’s offered the chance to join an Arctic expedition, he jumps at it. Spirits are high as the ship leaves Norway: five men and eight huskies, crossing the Barents Sea by the light of the midnight sun. At last they reach the remote, uninhabited bay where they will camp for the next year. Gruhuken.

But the Arctic summer is brief. As night returns to claim the land, Jack feels a creeping unease. One by one, his companions are forced to leave. He faces a stark choice. Stay or go. Soon he will see the last of the sun, as the polar night engulfs the camp in months of darkness. Soon he will reach the point of no return – when the sea will freeze, making escape impossible.

And Gruhuken is not uninhabited. Jack is not alone. Something walks there in the dark…’ – Amazon

Buy it here.

The Nordic Theory Of Everything By Anu Partanen

The Nordic Theory Of Everything is another book I’ve been longing to read, and now that it’s available on Kindle for 99p I’ll be delving into it this Christmas eve. Since living in Sweden, it’s come to my attention that, actually, not everything is as rosy as the majority of literature out there would lead you to believe…so it’ll be really interesting to read, reflect and no doubt debate the theories within its 432 pages, even if I’m outnumbered 10 to 1 this Christmas time.

y648.jpg

‘From childcare to healthcare provision for the elderly and tackling issues of homelessness, the Nordic countries are world leaders in organising society – no wonder Finland has been ranked among the happiest places in the world.

But when Finnish journalist Anu Partanen moved to America, she quickly realised that navigating the basics of everyday life was overly complicated compared to how society was organised in her homeland. From the complications of buying a mobile, to the arduous task of filing taxes, she knew there was a better way and as she got to know her new neighbours she discovered that they too shared her deep apprehensions.

The Nordic Theory of Everything details Partanen’s mission to understand why America (and much of the Western world) suffers from so much inequality and struggling social services. Filled with fascinating insights, advice and practical solutions, she makes a convincing argument that we can rebuild society, rekindle optimism and become more autonomous people by following in the footsteps of our neighbours to the North.’ – Amazon

Buy it here.

Reindeer An Arctic Life By Tilly Smith

I saw the cover of this book and thought to myself, ‘if I don’t enjoy this, I’m going to be really disappointed.’ I needn’t have worried though, as I took advantage of the ‘Look Inside’ feature on Amazon, had a read of a few pages and knew it was going to be a beautiful, captivating and enlightenment little read, from which I’d come away from a more learned and inspired reindeer obsessive.

51aWnLoNbiL

‘In this enchanting book, Tilly Smith leads the reader through the cold and extraordinary natural history of the reindeer.

A creature that is often used to adorn the winter season, the reindeer has been domesticated in Eurasia for longer than the horse while in North America it exists side by side with the humans, never tamed yet vital to the native settlements.

Despite the popularity of the image of the reindeer, they are rarely seen in real life.

This beautiful, comforting little book, peppered with anecdotes about the author’s own herd, is sure to kindle affection for one of nature’s most adaptable mammals, from fur-covered hooves to downy antlers.’ – The History Press

Buy it here.

 

Tales Of Iceland Or Running With The Huldefolk In The Permanent Daylight By Stephen Markley

While I’ve read (very) mixed reviews about this ‘fast, fun, educational and true story’ written by a journalist from Chicago who went to Iceland with his two friends, one of whom, Matthew Trinetti, is the main character in the book, it intrigued the hell out of me. And, seen as though I can get it free on Kindle Unlimited (if you don’t have Kindle Unlimited, get it. Seriously. It’s brilliant.) I thought why not.

51e8rILg+9L

‘When American author Stephen Markley was a fresh-faced, impressionable university student in Ohio, he saw Quentin Tarantino describe a trip he’d taken to Iceland.

“Supermodels working at McDonald’s,” said Tarantino of the Icelandic. Markley never forgot those words.

Seven years later, Markley set out with two friends for Iceland, and adventure would ensue. The three young men found a country straddling Europe and North America, recovering from its 2008 economic crisis, struggling to regain its national identity, influenced by the entire globe yet trafficking in its singular Icelandic sagas and legends.

With Tales of Iceland, Markley delivers the fastest, funniest memoir and travelogue of an American experience in Iceland.

Beware: You will NOT learn how to say “Which way to the potato farm” in the Icelandic language. Nor will you learn how to locate the finest dining options in Reykjavik, or the best opera house. This is not that kind of travel book. Markley and his two irrepressible twenty-something American pals do not like opera, had no money to eat much besides eggs and skyr, and learned only how to say “Skál!” “Takk,” and “Skyr.” – Amazon

Buy it here.

Icebreaker By Horatio Clare

I only found out about this book and it’s author Horatio Clare today, but this book is on my ‘must read before the end of 2018 list.’

‘We are celebrating a hundred years since independence this year: how would you like to travel on a government icebreaker?’

41lY0KRMvtL.jpg

A message from the Finnish embassy launches Horatio Clare on a voyage around an extraordinary country and an unearthly place, the frozen Bay of Bothnia, just short of the Arctic circle. Travelling with the crew of Icebreaker Otso, Horatio, whose last adventure saw him embedded on Maersk container vessels for the bestseller Down to the Sea in Ships, discovers stories of Finland, of her mariners and of ice.

Finland is an enigmatic place, famous for its educational miracle, healthcare and gender equality – as well as Nokia, Angry Birds, saunas, questionable cuisine and deep taciturnity. Aboard Otso Horatio gets to know the men who make up her crew, and explores Finland’s history and character. Surrounded by the extraordinary colours and conditions of a frozen sea, he also comes to understand something of the complexity and fragile beauty of ice, a near-miraculous substance which cools the planet, gives the stars their twinkle and which may hold all our futures in its crystals.’ – Amazon

Buy it here.

Other Titles To Check Out

ScandiKitchen: Fika & Hygge By Bronte Aurell

Wild Guide: Scandinavia By Ben Love

Scandinavian Christmas By Trine Hahnemann

Finding Sisu: In Search Of Courage, Strength And Happiness The Finnish Way By Katja Pantzar

Folklore: The Northlore Series Edited By MJ Kobernus

 

 

 

MostNorthern Shop Is Live!

I didn’t know a MostNorthern art and design shop would be happening until the day before yesterday. Once the idea sprouted, I couldn’t keep it contained, and, well, voila! HERE IT IS!

The premise of the shop is the same as it is here – to celebrate the north and raise awareness about climate change in the Arctic.

Below are a few of my designs on tote bags, because I love totes as much as life itself, plus, they’re one of the best answers to combating the environmental terrorist that is the plastic shopping bag.

kcScreenshot_2018-07-27 7 Names For Polar Bear MostNorthern's Artist ShopsScreenshot_2018-07-27 If Only You Knew MostNorthern's Artist ShopdaScreenshot_2018-07-27 North MostNorthern's Artist ab

 

Your Daily 5 Nordic Facts : Finland

  1. For some bizarre reason, there isn’t a single payphone in Finland.
  2. Sauna is the most used Finnish word outside of the motherland.
  3. I thought it would be Sweden, but apparently Finland has world’s highest annual consumption of milk per capita – around 1 litre per person every day.
  4. The blue of the Finnish flag represents the water of the thousands of lakes in the country, whereas the white represents snow, of which Finland sees a shit ton of in winter.
  5. Despite being the eighth largest country Europe, it’s the most sparsely populated country in the European Union.

 

Sources that helped me find this stuff: FactRepublic.comLandLopers.com, Quora

Your Daily 5 Nordic Facts : Iceland

  1. At about 39,000 square miles, Iceland is the same size as Cuba.
  2. There’s a volcanic eruption approximately every 4 years.
  3. Icelandic horses have two additional gaits as compared to all other breeds.
  4. Iceland was one of the last places on earth to be settled by humans.
  5. Raw puffin heart is an Icelandic delicacy.

Sources that helped me find this stuff: FactRepublic.comLandLopers.com, Quora

 

 

Your Daily 5 Nordic Facts : Norway

  1. On the island of Svalbard, carrying a gun outside populated areas is required by law because of the high chances you might find yourself face to face with a polar bear. If you don’t have a gun license, you’re not permitted to leave the settlement areas alone.
  2. Norway is just a bit bigger than the US state of New Mexico.
  3. If you publish a book in Norway, the government will buy 1000 copies (1,500 if it is a children’s book) and dole out them to libraries throughout the country.
  4. Linje Akvavit is a Norwegian flavoured liquor, and it’s production is a bit bloody weird. It’s shipped in oak barrels from Norway to Australia and back before being bottled. Apparently the constant movement and fluctuating temperatures give the liquor it’s special taste as well as accelerating its maturity.
  5. The US has more people of Norwegian descent than Norway.

 

Sources that helped me find this stuff: Sysselmannen.no, FactRepublic.com, Quora

Your Eyes In The North

I am going to assume that, if you’ve picked this blog to read from the other 37 million sites that are hosted by WordPress, then you’re northerly obsessed.

I’m also going to assume that you can’t go a day without thinking about the most northerly places on our planet, and you have, within your soul, this insatiable hunger for pretty much everything to do with the Nordic countries and the High Arctic.

For the record, the above paragraph is me in a nutshell. If it’s you too, then I hope MostNorthern will be able to satisfy your hunger. At least for a little while.  If we’re alike in our obsession, you’ll know it’s only a matter of time before you need your next northerly fix. And that’s where I come in. To try and provide that, to try and be your eyes in the north.

IMG_7887-2

In case you’ve skipped over the About page, my name is Katie Metcalfe and I’m an English writer, blogger and poet living in Sweden.

I’ve been writing on the subject of ‘North’ for over a decade, and have a solid portfolio on writings about everything northerly, from the life of Swedish author Astrid Lindgren, to the mythology of the Greenlandic Inuit, from the experience of dining on the Icelandic delicacy hákarl (fermented shark) to not being allowed to die in the Norwegian Arctic town of Longyearbyen.

cropped-mostnorthern.jpg

MostNorthern was established because, to put it quite bluntly, I wasn’t able to find another blog out there that could successfully satisfy my northerly needs. (Please do shout if you are able to recommend blogs I may have missed…)

It exists  to celebrate everything Nordic, with a special focus on raising awareness about the Arctic, and the current climate crisis going on at the top of the world. I really hope, that, while satisfying my curiosities and interests in all things northerly, I’ll satisfy yours too.

If there’s anything northerly that you would like an insight into, or if there is a northerner who you have been itching to learn more about through an interview, or even if you want to make a suggestion on how MostNorthern can be improved, please leave a comment below or email me at: mostnorthern@hotmail.com

Katie – Your Eyes In The North